Critically Endangered


 

Clouded leopards born at the National Zoo’s Conservation and Research Center by Smithsonian’s National Zoo on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The pair of day-old clouded leopard cubs during one of their feedings, which occur every three hours. 
Born at the National Zoo’s Conservation and Research Center in Front Royal, Va on Tuesday, March 24, the two cubs are the first to be born at the Center in 16 years. 
Breeding clouded leopards in captivity has been a challenge, primarily due to male aggression, decreased breeding activity between paired animals, and high cub mortality. 
The National Zoo’s team has learned how to reduce the risk of fatal attacks by hand-rearing cubs for socialization and also introducing males to their mates when they are six months old, allowing the pair to grow up together. 
Clouded leopards Hannibal and Jao Chu, the parents of these cubs and the only compatible pair of clouded leopards at CRC, are proof that these techniques work. The new cubs are being hand-reared by experienced CRC staff.
Photo Credit: Jessie Cohen/ Smithsonian’s National Zoo

Clouded leopards born at the National Zoo’s Conservation and Research Center by Smithsonian’s National Zoo on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The pair of day-old clouded leopard cubs during one of their feedings, which occur every three hours.

Born at the National Zoo’s Conservation and Research Center in Front Royal, Va on Tuesday, March 24, the two cubs are the first to be born at the Center in 16 years.

Breeding clouded leopards in captivity has been a challenge, primarily due to male aggression, decreased breeding activity between paired animals, and high cub mortality.

The National Zoo’s team has learned how to reduce the risk of fatal attacks by hand-rearing cubs for socialization and also introducing males to their mates when they are six months old, allowing the pair to grow up together.

Clouded leopards Hannibal and Jao Chu, the parents of these cubs and the only compatible pair of clouded leopards at CRC, are proof that these techniques work. The new cubs are being hand-reared by experienced CRC staff.

Photo Credit: Jessie Cohen/ Smithsonian’s National Zoo

I see you! by dbqueen on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Tarsier Monkey
Bohol, Philippines

I see you! by dbqueen on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Tarsier Monkey
Bohol, Philippines

Belugas Underwater by flickkerphotos on Flickr.

Belugas Underwater by flickkerphotos on Flickr.

Aloe polyphylla Schönland ex Pillans by brewbooks on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Aloe polyphylla Schönland ex Pillans
Asphodelaceae Also placed in: Aloaceae 
Monocot
Spiral Aloe
Endangered native of the Maluti Mountains in Lesotho, Africa. 
Grows in rock crevices at high altitudes,
Only alpine member of the genus Aloe. 
Threats to populations of spiral aloe include 
overgrazing, unsustainable harvesting by plant enthusiasts and people interested in its medicinal properties, and the increasing rarity of its pollinator, the Malachite Sunbird.
from www.usbg.gov/plant-collections/conservation/Aloe-polyphyl…
Also see Paloma Gardens, Cliive & Nicki Higgie, 
Fordell, Wanganui,  North Island, New ZealandNorthwest Horticulture Society  November, 2005 tour
i110405 098

Aloe polyphylla Schönland ex Pillans by brewbooks on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Aloe polyphylla Schönland ex Pillans
Asphodelaceae Also placed in: Aloaceae
Monocot
Spiral Aloe

Endangered native of the Maluti Mountains in Lesotho, Africa.

Grows in rock crevices at high altitudes,

Only alpine member of the genus Aloe.

Threats to populations of spiral aloe include
overgrazing, unsustainable harvesting by plant enthusiasts and people interested in its medicinal properties, and the increasing rarity of its pollinator, the Malachite Sunbird.

from www.usbg.gov/plant-collections/conservation/Aloe-polyphyl…

Also see Paloma Gardens, Cliive & Nicki Higgie,
Fordell, Wanganui, North Island, New Zealand
Northwest Horticulture Society November, 2005 tour
i110405 098

African wild dog (Striped dog)(Lycaon pictus)(Endangered) by Arno & Louise Wildlife on Flickr.

African wild dog (Striped dog)(Lycaon pictus)(Endangered) by Arno & Louise Wildlife on Flickr.

Chasm, Port Villa,Vanuatu pictures underwater photos by flickkerphotos on Flickr.

Chasm, Port Villa,Vanuatu pictures underwater photos by flickkerphotos on Flickr.

Snow Leopard on Rocks by Mr Mo-Fo on Flickr.

Snow Leopard on Rocks by Mr Mo-Fo on Flickr.

Panamanian Golden Frog - Atelopus zeteki by brian.gratwicke on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The Panamanian golden frog (Atelopus zeteki) is a critically endangered toad which is endemic to Panama. It has been considered a subspecies of A. varius, but is now generally regarded as a separate species.[1] While the IUCN still lists it as critically endangered,[2] it may have been extinct in the wild since 2007. Individuals have been collected for breeding in captivity in a bid to preserve the species.[3]
Although known as a frog, the golden frog, despite being smooth-skinned and frog-like in appearance, is classified as a “True toad” (Bufonidae). Like other frogs and toads, the golden frog is capable of secreting poison to help protect themselves from predators. In the case of the golden frog, this is a water-soluble neurotoxin called zetekitoxin.[4]
In dry habitat, the adult male measures 35 millimetres (1.4 in) to 40 millimetres (1.6 in) and weighs 3 grams (0.11 oz) to 5 grams (0.18 oz). The adult female ranges from 45 to 55 mm and from 4 to 7 g. It is larger in wet forests, where the male can grow to 48 mm and weigh up to 12 g, and the female can be as large as 63 mm and weigh up to 15 g.[5] They inhabit tropical forest regions, particularly on mountains, near streams.[4]

Panamanian Golden Frog - Atelopus zeteki by brian.gratwicke on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The Panamanian golden frog (Atelopus zeteki) is a critically endangered toad which is endemic to Panama. It has been considered a subspecies of A. varius, but is now generally regarded as a separate species.[1] While the IUCN still lists it as critically endangered,[2] it may have been extinct in the wild since 2007. Individuals have been collected for breeding in captivity in a bid to preserve the species.[3]
Although known as a frog, the golden frog, despite being smooth-skinned and frog-like in appearance, is classified as a “True toad” (Bufonidae). Like other frogs and toads, the golden frog is capable of secreting poison to help protect themselves from predators. In the case of the golden frog, this is a water-soluble neurotoxin called zetekitoxin.[4]

In dry habitat, the adult male measures 35 millimetres (1.4 in) to 40 millimetres (1.6 in) and weighs 3 grams (0.11 oz) to 5 grams (0.18 oz). The adult female ranges from 45 to 55 mm and from 4 to 7 g. It is larger in wet forests, where the male can grow to 48 mm and weigh up to 12 g, and the female can be as large as 63 mm and weigh up to 15 g.[5] They inhabit tropical forest regions, particularly on mountains, near streams.[4]

American Bison by Dom Dada on Flickr.Via Flickr:Bison bison (buffalo), Hall of North American Mammals at the Museum of Natural History, Manhattan/New York

American Bison by Dom Dada on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Bison bison (buffalo), Hall of North American Mammals at the Museum of Natural History, Manhattan/New York

Poppy by rbleib on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla beringei), Parc des Volcans, Rwanda.
Poppy is the matriarch of the Susa Group in the Parc des Volcans, Rwanda, as well as the only one of the group who was a contemporary of Dian Fossey when she was doing her research in Rwanda.  
There are currently around 800 wild mountain gorillas left in the world.

Poppy by rbleib on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla beringei), Parc des Volcans, Rwanda.

Poppy is the matriarch of the Susa Group in the Parc des Volcans, Rwanda, as well as the only one of the group who was a contemporary of Dian Fossey when she was doing her research in Rwanda.

There are currently around 800 wild mountain gorillas left in the world.